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Spring 2024

Innovation Talks

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College of health Solutions Innovation Talks are brought to you by the Design and Innovation Studio for Health (DISH) team. These talks highlight discoveries and new directions within and across the focal areas, centers and cores, and emerging initiatives of the College of Health Solutions.

 

College of Health Solutions Building

Join us at the next event

Neuroscience in your neighborhood
Thursday, April 25 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm MST (Arizona time)

Two primary challenges facing various types of human research are scalability and population representation. In this presentation, I will highlight two distinct solutions to these challenges based on our studies of healthy brain aging. One approach will center on the utilization of internet-based participant recruitment through the MindCrowd study, which has been running for over ten years. This study has amassed cognitive testing data from approximately 500,000 participants worldwide, providing a large and diverse cohort for analysis. Another approach will emphasize the use of a low-field MRI-equipped mobile laboratory. This study, launched six months ago, has successfully recruited over 400 participants from rural Arizona zip codes. I will discuss the current scientific findings from each study and explore the impact these two different approaches have demonstrated on scalability and representation.

In Person: Health North 101/103

Zoom Passcode: 675849

Zoom Option
Matthew Huentelman Profile Photo

Innovation Talks archive


Feb. 1, 2024

Barriers to Implementing Value-Based Payment and Improving Population Health in the United States

Dr. Montalvo is an Assistant Teaching Professor of Movement Sciences in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. She has a PhD in Kinesiology from Penn State and a Master's in Public Health from the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on injury epidemiology and her current area of study is related to application of new technologies to understand trends in heat-related injury. Heat-related illness (HRI) is a leading cause of death and disability in youth athletes. Risk of HRI will continue to rise as climate change progresses. The burden will likely disproportionately impact athletes in communities of color, though evidence of racial disparities on HRI in youth athletes is lacking. This talk will address current epidemiological evidence of HRI in youth athletes, children more broadly, and policy implications, and will propose several potential solutions to address the problem.

William Riley, PhD
Kailey Love, MBA, MS


Feb. 8, 2024

Prevention of Pediatric Heat-Related Illness

Dr. Montalvo is an Assistant Teaching Professor of Movement Sciences in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. She has a PhD in Kinesiology from Penn State and a Master's in Public Health from the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on injury epidemiology and her current area of study is related to application of new technologies to understand trends in heat-related injury. Heat-related illness (HRI) is a leading cause of death and disability in youth athletes. Risk of HRI will continue to rise as climate change progresses. The burden will likely disproportionately impact athletes in communities of color, though evidence of racial disparities on HRI in youth athletes is lacking. This talk will address current epidemiological evidence of HRI in youth athletes, children more broadly, and policy implications, and will propose several potential solutions to address the problem.

Alicia Montalvo, PhD, MPH


Feb. 22, 2024

Sensorimotor Control Mechanisms and Applications to Human-Machine Interactions

Dr. Santello is professor and director of the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering in the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University. Over the past few decades, motor control research has provided significant insights into humans' ability to learn and execute movements. The dominant theoretical framework posits that humans can control movements based on an internal model of their body's dynamics. This framework, however, cannot account for a different class of movements: physical cooperation. When cooperating with a human partner, successful completion of a joint task must also consider predicting and reacting to the partner's actions. Dr Santello will give an overview of human-human physical interaction research and highlight applications to human-machine interactions

Marco Santello, PhD


March 28, 2024

Effortless Training of Attention and Self-Contro

YiYuan Tang, PhD, is a Professor of Health Neuroscience, Prevention Science, and Data Science, and the Director of the Health Neuroscience Collaboratory at the College of Health Solutions, ASU. Funded by the NIH, DoD, and private foundations, his research mainly focuses on the brain and body mechanisms of attention, self-control, emotion regulation, stress resilience, and decision-making related to whole person health, healthy behavior, habits, and lifestyles, and evidence-based interventions to improve human performance, prevent and ameliorate behavioral problems and mental disorders over the lifespan. He has published 10 books and over 360 peer-reviewed articles such as Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Trends in Cognitive Sciences. He is among the top 2% of the world's most cited scientists (Elsevier).

YiYuan Tang, PhD


April 4, 2024

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Promoting Equity in Maternal and Child Health for Underserved Communities

Ehiremen (Ehi) Azugbene is a Presidential Postdoctoral Scholar actively engaged with the Maternal and Child Health Translational Research Team (MCHTRT) at the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. Her research focus is on addressing the maternal healthcare needs of underserved populations, with an emphasis on refugee and immigrant communities. Her research encompasses various aspects of maternal and child health, including health literacy, health disparities, healthcare utilization, health policy, health services, and global health.

Ehiremen (Ehi) Adesua Azugbene Ph.D. MPH CHES


April 11, 2024

Strategies Towards Healthier and More Livable Urban Environments

Dr. Ariane Middel is an Associate Professor in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering and the School of Computing and Augmented Intelligence. Her research focuses on how urban form and design affect heat and human thermal exposure in cities. Dr. Middel has advanced urban climate science through applied and solutions-oriented research using innovative field methods such as MaRTy (a mobile human-biometeorological weather station), microclimate simulations, and human-centric modeling. Dr. Middel is the President of the International Association for Urban Climate (IAUC) and directs the SHaDE Lab at ASU, which brings together students from multidisciplinary backgrounds to develop creative solutions for urban climate challenges that confront our society. Dr. Middel's work lies at the intersection of climate and health and aims to develop local- to regional-scale heat interventions to improve the health and livability of urban populations.

Matt Huentleman, PhD


April 25, 2024

The Application of Web- and Mobile Laboratory-Based Research to Recruit and Study Large Cohorts

Two primary challenges facing various types of human research are scalability and population representation. In this presentation, I will highlight two distinct solutions to these challenges based on our studies of healthy brain aging. One approach will center on the utilization of internet-based participant recruitment through the MindCrowd study, which has been running for over ten years. This study has amassed cognitive testing data from approximately 500,000 participants worldwide, providing a large and diverse cohort for analysis. Another approach will emphasize the use of a low-field MRI-equipped mobile laboratory. This study, launched six months ago, has successfully recruited over 400 participants from rural Arizona zip codes. I will discuss the current scientific findings from each study and explore the impact these two different approaches have demonstrated on scalability and representation.

Matt Huentleman, PhD