School for the Science of Health Care Delivery

Home / Degree Programs / Academic Units / School for the Science of Health Care Delivery / Current Research / Using behavioral economics to transform U.S. health care delivery and disease management

Using behavioral economics to transform U.S. health care delivery and disease management

Research Topic(s): Health Economic & Policy

Principle Investigators: Ellen P. Green, PhD and David Etzioni, MD

Co-Investigators: Noël Arring, DNP, RN, OCN, Janet O’Brien, PhD, RN, CHSE, Katie Peterson, MSN, RN, Kathy Markiewicz, M.S., RN, CHSE, Kristen Will, MPHE, P.A.-C, Dorilee Fransworth, CNP, RN

Abstract:

A better understanding of the fundamental drivers of provider behavior could lead to significant improvements in US healthcare delivery. High-quality patient-centered care at Mayo Clinic is in large part driven by providers vesting in the values of the clinic: respect, compassion, integrity, healing, teamwork, excellence, innovation, and stewardship. These values, rather than direct payment incentives, have led Mayo Clinic to consistently rank among the top healthcare providers. However, regulators and insurers have increasingly lobbied for payment based on outcomes. While outcome-based payment is effective in theory, studies have not shown improvement in performance and reduction of costs. This is likely because payment incentives create conflict for providers. That is, an increased reliance on payment incentives may misdirect provider’s focus from patient-centered care to outcome-centered care. The disconnect between the success of the Mayo Clinic Model of Care and the push for payment incentives demonstrates the need for a better understanding of the fundamental drivers of high quality care. The goals of this project are to understand the role of behavioral economics in achieving high quality health outcomes and inform policymakers and healthcare organizations.

< Back to Faculty Research