We need to talk...a series of tough conversations about health

About the Series

The series brings together experts from the fields of medicine, business and the law to examine the medical, ethical and legal issues surrounding such hot-button health topics as artificial medical devices, end-of-life care decisions, and medical mistakes. Each conversation will begin with a guest interview by local moderators the first half of the discussion followed by a Q & A with the audience the last half. A short reception precedes each event.

All sessions are free and open to the public with online registration.

Upcoming Events

Click on any event below to see details and registration information.

Guests

Mark W. Imig, MD

Mark W. Imig, MD
Child, Adolescent and Adult Psychiatrist, Assistant Professor at Mayo Clinic School of Medicine


Suniya Luthar

Suniya Luthar
Professor of Psychology, Arizona State University
Professor Emerita, Columbia University's Teachers College


Celice Korsten, Psy.D.

Celice Korsten, Psy.D.
Clinical and Forensic Psychologist

Moderator

Pauline Davies, professor of practice for ASU’s Hugh Downs School of Human Communication

Kathy Ritchie, reporter, KJZZ Radio

Date and Time

March 14, 2018
Reception: 4:30-5:00 pm
Discussion: 5:00-6:00 p.m.

Location

First Amendment Forum
Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication
555 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85004

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Description

The mental health system in the U.S. is in dire need of repair and appears to be failing some of our most vulnerable populations. 1 in 5 adolescents ages 13-18 have or will be diagnosed with a serious mental illness. Additionally, suicide is the third leading cause of death in youth ages 10-24. Despite the popularity of controversial television series like "13 Reasons Why", more dialogue is needed to begin addressing mental health issues in this population.

This Tough Conversation will explore the following questions:

  • Why is this so difficult to talk about? For parents? Adolescents? Educators? Communities?
  • What are the primary causes for the uptake in these presentations for adolescents?
  • Who is at highest risk?
  • What roles should schools play in managing this crisis?
  • How does social media play a role and what can be done?
  • How do you break through the cultural barriers and the stigma associated with mental health problems?
  • What are the specific challenges for those from low-income backgrounds?
  • What changes do we need in the health care delivery system?
  • Which interventions are the most effective in addressing these issues?

Guest

Ayan Sen, MD

Ayan Sen, MD, MSc, FACEP, FCCP
Consultant, Critical Care Medicine
Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine/ Emergency Medicine
Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Arizona


John Shufeldt

John Shufeldt, MD, JD, MBA, FACEP
Emergency Medicine Physician, Shufeldt Consulting

Moderator

Pauline Davies, professor of practice for ASU’s Hugh Downs School of Human Communication

Will Stone, senior field correspondent, KJZZ Radio

Date and Time

April 18, 2018
Reception: 4:30-5:00 p.m.
Discussion: 5:00-6:00 p.m.

Location

First Amendment Forum
Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication
555 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85004

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Description

Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the U.S., making this a critical issue to discuss in an open and low-risk environment.

This Tough Conversation will explore how to handle medical errors.

  • Can you honestly say you’re sorry without penalty?

Previous Events

Click on any event below to see details and view recording.

Guest

Joseph Drazkowski

Joseph Drazkowski, MD
Professor of Neurology
Associate Dean of the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine
Member of Arizona Department of Transportation Medical Advisory Board

Moderators

  • Preston Phillips, CBS 5 TV morning anchor
  • Pauline Davies, professor of practice for ASU’s Hugh Downs School of Human Communication
  • Carrie Jung and Mariana Dale, senior field correspondents, KJZZ Radio

Date and Time

October 17, 2017
Reception: 4:30-5:00 p.m.
Discussion: 5:00-6:00 p.m.

Location

Health North 110
ASU Downtown Phoenix campus

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Description

Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, epilepsy, medical cannabis use, sleep disorders, arrhythmias, or other conditions such as hypoglycemia, can make for deadly road conditions when patients with these health issues insist on continuing to drive.

This Tough Conversation will address the following questions:

  • What are the appropriate medical and legal approaches to pulling someone’s keys?
  • What if a patient drives away from the clinic despite a warning not to?
  • What about patients who use cannabis or pain meds for medical conditions?
  • When can they not drive, and what is the medical community’s ethical responsibility?
  • If self-driving cars become accepted, will these issues go away?

Guest

Frank Fischer

Frank Fischer
CEO of Neuropace

Moderators

  • Preston Phillips, CBS 5 TV morning anchor
  • Pauline Davies, professor of practice for ASU’s Hugh Downs School of Human Communication
  • Carrie Jung and Mariana Dale, senior field correspondents, KJZZ Radio

Date and Time

October 24, 2017
Reception: 4:30-6:00 p.m.
Discussion: 5:00-6:00 p.m.

Location

Health North 110
ASU Downtown Phoenix campus

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Description

Given the high number of devices implanted in Americans for everything from arrhythmia to seizures and tremors, it’s time to talk about the resulting legal and ethical implications of these bionic health devices.

This Tough Conversation will explore the following questions:

  • What are the rules for safety?
  • Who owns these devices after death?
  • What about cyber attacks targeting these devices?
  • What are the privacy issues?
  • Who takes responsibility when something goes wrong — the doctor, or the company that produces the devices?
  • Are only well insured Americans getting these miracle health devices?

Guest

Sanjeev Arora

Sanjeev Arora, MD
Professor of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico

Moderator

Pauline Davies, professor of practice for ASU’s Hugh Downs School of Human Communication

Date and Time

November 13, 2017
Reception: 4:30-5:00 p.m
Discussion: 5:00-6:00 p.m.

Location

Health North 110
ASU Downtown Phoenix campus

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Description

One of the pillars of American health care is that primary care physicians refer their patients to specialists for complex diseases. However, this doesn’t happen for everyone. Wait lists, a lack of doctors in certain medical fields, money, and the geographic location of the patient all play a role in determining which patients will actually be treated by a specialist.

This Tough Conversation will explore the following questions:

  • What happens when patients live in underserved areas and can’t get into a specialist for care?
  • How do we fix a system so that everyone is helped?

Guest

Tom R. Fitch, MD

Tom R. Fitch, MD
Consultant and Director, Center for Palliative Medicine and the Division of Hematology and Oncology at Mayo Clinic


Gobi Paramanandam, MD

Gobi Paramanandam, MD
Director, Arizona Palliative Home Care

Moderator

Pauline Davies, professor of practice for ASU’s Hugh Downs School of Human Communication

Will Stone, senior field correspondent, KJZZ Radio

Date and Time

February 7, 2018
Reception: 4:30-5:00 p.m.
Discussion: 5:00-6:00 pm

Location

Beus Center for Law and Society
Armstrong Hall, Rm 141
111 E Taylor St
Phoenix, AZ 85004

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Description

Runaway medical costs are a huge concern for patients needing expensive end-of-life care. Exorbitant ambulance, emergency room and hospital charges can financially ruin a family without providing a higher quality of life for the patient.

This Tough Conversation will address the following questions:

  • How do you give patients back their dignity at the end of life?
  • How do you have that conversation?
  • What are the rights of patients who can’t speak?

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