School of Nutrition and Health Promotion

Frequently Asked Questions

For information regarding admissions, selecting a program, tuition and other advising questions, please visit the College of Health Solutions Advising and Resources pages.

Undergraduate Programs

ASU offers pre-health advising at the Downtown Phoenix, Tempe and West campuses. These offices help students compare schools and programs to determine which one is the best match for their career goals.  CHS students should still visit the Academic Advising for questions related to degree requirements.

 

Graduate Programs

Contact your academic advisor to learn more about the School of Nutrition and Health Promotion graduate programs

Exercise and Wellness, MS and 
Exercise and Wellness (Healthy Aging), MS

There are a limited number of teaching assistantships available each year. These assistantships are competitive and are based on applicant qualifications, program needs, and funding availability. If you are interested in an assistantship, please complete the supplemental application form PDF for a teaching assistantship when you submit your application to Graduate Admissions.

The basic plan of study includes a total of 36 hours of required course work. See Master of Science, program of study.

Thesis Option: All students are required to complete the 15 credits of core coursework (EXW/NTR 500 Research Methods, EXW 501 Research statistics, EXW 536 Physiology of Physical Activity and Chronic Disease, and EXW 542 Health Promotion Theory) and 9 credits in a focus area on either Health Promotion and Physical Activity or Fitness and Conditioning. Students electing the thesis option must also complete 6 credits of thesis hours. The thesis is considered a final integrative experience of the knowledge base gained in the MS Exercise and Wellness program. It involves carrying out research that is guided by a recognized research paradigm (e.g., scientific, interpretive) and produces a scholarly report of the process and results. An Exercise and Wellness Program mentor and two other committee members guide a student’s work, and a final oral examination pertaining to the thesis is required. The thesis option is a good choice for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced graduate study in the field. (More information about the thesis and a graduation timeline is available from your mentor).

Non-Thesis Option: All students are required to complete the 15 credits of core coursework (EXW/NTR 500 Research Methods, EXW 501 Research statistics, EXW 536 Physiology of Physical Activity and Chronic Disease, and EXW 542 Health Promotion Theory) and 15 credits in a focus area on either Health Promotion and Physical Activity or Fitness and Conditioning. Students electing the non-thesis option will be required to successfully complete a written comprehensive examination which will be taken after completion of 30 credit hours. The comprehensive examination is considered a final integrative experience in which students demonstrate mastery of the knowledge base gained in the MS Exercise and Wellness program. The non-thesis option is a good choice for students who are seeking to continue their education, advance their skill level as practitioners, or advance their current careers.

Final selection of either the thesis or non-thesis track is made upon submission and approval of the plan of study. The plan of study must be submitted in the semester in which students enroll in their 15th credit hour (typically the second semester).
What is the curriculum for the MS Exercise and Wellness, Healthy Aging degree?
The basic plan of study includes a total of 36 hours of required course work. See Master of Science, program of study.

Thesis Option: All students are required to complete the 9 credits of core courses, 15 credits of required concentration courses, 6 credits of elective courses (EXW 591, EXW 592, and EXW 500), and 6 credit hours for the culminating experience. The thesis is considered a final integrative experience of the knowledge base gained in the MS Exercise and Wellness, Healthy Aging program. It involves carrying out research that is guided by a recognized research paradigm (e.g., scientific, interpretive) and produces a scholarly report of the process and results. An Exercise and Wellness, Healthy Aging Program mentor and two other committee members guide a student’s work, and a final oral examination pertaining to the thesis is required. The thesis option is a good choice for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced graduate study in the field. (More information about the thesis and a graduation timeline is available from your mentor.)

Non-Thesis Options:  All students are required to complete the 9 credits of core courses, 15 credits of required concentration courses, 6 credits of elective courses (EXW 591, EXW 592, and EXW 500), and 6 credits for the culminating experience.  Students electing a non-thesis option will be required to successfully complete either an internship and a written comprehensive examination OR a Capstone project.  The comprehensive examination which will be taken after completion of 36 credit hours  is considered a final integrative experience in which students demonstrate mastery of the knowledge base gained in the MS Exercise and Wellness, Healthy Aging program. The non-thesis option is a good choice for students who are seeking to continue their education, advance their skill level as practitioners, or advance their current careers.

Final selection of either the thesis or non-thesis track is made upon submission and approval of the plan of study. The plan of study must be submitted in the semester in which students enroll in their 15th credit hour (typically the second semester).

Students who do not have undergraduate credit for the basic courses required for a BS degree in Exercise and Wellness can be admitted with deficiencies. Deficiencies are determined upon admission and students will be provided with a list of courses that must be completed before graduation. These courses are not considered part of the graduate program of study. Sometimes a graduate class can be taken to substitute for a undergraduate deficiency on a case-by-case basis. (For more information about deficiencies, contact the MS Exercise and Wellness Program Coordinator).

Admission to the MS degree program is based on a number of factors including: GPA, GRE scores, letters of recommendation, and statement of career/research interests. In addition to meeting Graduate College requirements, students must submit a letter of intent. Applicants whose native language is not English must submit a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score. Admission decisions are based on the compatibility of the applicant’s research interests and career goals with the purpose of the degree program, previous academic training and GPA, GRE scores, and recommendations. Applications will be reviewed beginning January 15th and will continue as long as space is available.

Professionals in education, fitness and wellness, worksite or community health promotion, and personal training who are interested in an advanced preparation in exercise and wellness as well as those interested in advanced graduate study in physical activity and chronic disease should consider the program. The thesis option is a good choice for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced graduate study in the field. The non-thesis option is a good choice for students who are seeking to continue their education, advance their skill level as practitioners, or advance their current careers.

There are career options in Exercise and Wellness. Some positions require advanced or specialized training, certification, or graduate degrees.

MS degree students are allowed but are not required to take up to six credit hours of internship as part of the program of study with approval from the student's advisor and the MS Exercise and Wellness Degree Coordinator.

All students are assigned an advisor upon successful admission into the program. Learn more about Academic Advising.

Graduates from our Master's degree program in Exercise and Wellness develop the skills and strategies needed to promote physical activity and health in the community, rehabilitation, academic, business and agency settings. They are also prepared for jobs as health promotion specialists, physical activity and fitness leaders, fitness and wellness directors, exercise physiologists and professors, just to name a few.

Physical Activity, Nutrition and Wellness PhD

The PANW PhD program requires a minimum of three years of full-time study.  The intent is to provide students depth in research inquiry methods and breadth in nutrition & health or physical activity &health content focus areas. The Plan of Study (POS) consists of a minimum of 67 credit hours past the master’s degree distributed across four areas of study (i.e., statistics/research (35 credit hours); professional development (5 credit hours); focus area (15 credit hours); and dissertation (12 credit hours)). 

No. We only admit students once a year in the Fall of each academic year. All new PhD students enter together in one cohort.

No the MS degree does not need to be from these fields. HOWEVER, it is expected that students admitted to the Ph.D. program will have a strong foundation in either physical activity/ exercise science and health promotion and/ or nutrition science.  The following pre-requisite courses or their equivalent are needed prior to starting the program: Human Anatomy, Human Physiology, Human Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, Upper Division Nutrition, Graduate Research Methods and Graduate Research Statistics. NOTE: Other undergraduate courses such as biochemistry, microbiology, organic chemistry, biophysics, kinesiology, exercise testing, health behavior change, exercise prescription etc. may be recommended to be taken depending on the student’s background and area of study. These courses will be determined by the student’s mentor and program committee prior to admission.

Yes graduate assistantships are available. All students who are accepted into the program are provided funding support as a TA, an RA or through a government fellowship. In fact we do not accept any students UNLESS they are given assistantships. Because of this we have a small and very competitive program. We typically have funding for 2-3 TAs and 1-3 RAs in any one year… thus we accept a total 3-6 new Ph.D. students each year. This means that even though a student may meet the admission requirements, he/she may not be admitted because there is no funding available.

Once you start the application process you will see that the requests for letters of recommendation are sent automatically and electronically by ASU to those people you select. Your recommenders just need to reply electronically through the system.

Students may be denied admission if: a) they do not have an MS degree, b) their MS degree or their undergraduate Junior/Senior GPA is under 3.0; c) their V or Q GRE score is less than 385 old or 138 new, d) their stated research interests are not consistent with those of the concentration area to which they are applying, e) if no faculty member indicated willingness to serve as the applicant’s supervisory committee chair /Mentor and/or f) if no funding for a graduate assistantship or other University support (TA, RA, fellowship, scholarship) for three years is available.

On the old test you cannot get lower than a 385 on either the V or Q GRE score. On the new GRE test you need about a 140 or higher on the V and Q. You cannot get lower than a 138 on either. Over the past 3 years GRE scores of those admitted average 150 V and 154 Q.

Our program is designed to prepare researchers. Thus your letter of intent should describe your interest and experience in research and why you want a PhD. It is typically 1 -2 pages. Typically we encourage our students to pursue postdoctoral research positions. Graduates will be prepared for research careers in higher education, governmental agencies, and health-related positions in private industry. You would need to address this in your letter of intent and discuss which faculty member you would want to work with as a mentor.

Read the document describing the faculty research interests. Contact at least two people with whom you have similar scholarly interests. Not all mentors have funding available to take a student each year. Admission is linked to funding.

Internships

Kinesiology

The KIN 484 Internship is successful when both the student and the internship site are aware of and fulfill the established requirements. For the employer, these expectations are as follows:

  • The internship site must provide at least 120 hours of unpaid internship work for the student.
  • Internships can be paid and should be if the student is asked to do a significant amount of work for the internship site.
  • An affiliation agreement for your site must be on file with the School of Nutrition and Health Promotion at Arizona State University. The affiliation document can be obtained from the internship coordinator in the Kinesiology program.
  • Students will work directly with a site supervisor.
  • The work is expected to provide a meaningful opportunity for learning. The student should work closely on application of knowledge through project-based, hands-on activities with his or her designated site supervisor. Clerical or administrative work will not be approved as part of the internship plan.
  • The site supervisor will need to work with the student to complete the intent form, the educational contract, and the midterm and final evaluations. This includes outlining the instructional goals and objectives of the internship experience, and providing feedback to increase student knowledge and performance.

No, all internship experiences must be completed in the semester that you are enrolled in the KIN 484 course.

In order to receive a passing grade and credit for the internship, you have to work 120 hours between the start and end dates of the semester you are enrolled. There are no minimum/maximum requirements for what you have to work per week, but in order to complete the total amount required by the end of the semester, you should be working at least 10 hours at your internship site per week.

Since credit for the internship is awarded on a pass/fail basis, the answer is both yes and no.If you pass, you will receive the additional three credit hours, but your GPA will not be affected. However, if you fail, your GPA will reflect the "E" that is given.

Unfortunately you cannot. Since the internship is considered equivalent to a part-time job, students who are at or above 18 credit hours are not allowed to enroll.

Yes, students may repeat KIN 484 for a total of six credits and apply to degree program. The second internship must be completed at a different internship site and during a different semester.

KIN 484 credit is given on a Pass/Fail (Y/E) basis. Credit will only be awarded if all of the program criteria are met. This includes completion of the 120 hours, submission of all required coursework (such as weekly journal entries, evaluations, and final reflective paper), and demonstrating appropriate professional behavior while at your internship site. Any behavior that would elicit disciplinary action is grounds for a failing grade.

No, your current job is not eligible to be considered for KIN 484 internship credit.