Edward Shortliffe

Biography

Dr. Shortliffe is an adjunct professor of biomedical informatics in the College of Health Solutions. Previously at ASU he was a part-time clinical professor (2012-2018) and a full professor with tenure (2007-2009).  Among his many contributions, he served as the founding dean of the Phoenix campus of the University of Arizonas College of Medicine. He spearheaded the formation and evolution of graduate degree programs in biomedical informatics at Stanford, Columbia, and Arizona State Universities. His research interests include the broad range of issues related to integrated decision-support systems, their effective implementation, and the role of the Internet in health care.

He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Association of American Physicians. He has also been elected to fellowship in the American College of Medical Informatics and the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. A Master of the American College of Physicians, he received the Grace Murray Hopper Award of the Association for Computing Machinery in 1976. Currently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Biomedical Informatics and the well known textbook Biomedical Informatics: Computer Applications in Health Care and Biomedicine, Dr. Shortliffe has authored more than 350 articles and books in the fields of biomedical computing and artificial intelligence.

Education

  • Residency in internal medicine, Stanford University Hospital (1977-1979)
  • Internship in internal medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (1976-1977)
  • M.D. Stanford University School of Medicine 1976
  • Ph.D. Medical Information Sciences, Stanford University 1975
  • A.B. Applied Mathematics and Computer Science (Magna Cum Laude), Harvard University 1970

Research Interests

Although no longer actively involved in research, his past interests have included the broad range of issues related to integrated decision-support systems (with an emphasis on expert systems), their effective implementation, and the role of the Internet in health care.

Research Group

N/A

Publications

See CV

Presentations

Dr. Shortliffe is a frequent guest lecturer in a variety of biomedical informatics courses at ASU.

Honors/Awards

  • Graduation Magna Cum Laude, Harvard College, June 1970
  • Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP), NIH-funded Stanford Traineeship, September 1971 - June 1976
  • Grace Murray Hopper Award (Distinguished computer scientist under age 30), Association for Computing Machinery, October 1976
  • Research Career Development Award, National Library of Medicine, July 1979June 1984
  • Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Faculty Scholar in General Internal Medicine, July 1983June 1988
  • Young Investigator Award, Western Society for Clinical Investigation, February 1987
  • Elected Member, National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine), National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 1987
  • Elected Fellow, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), 1990
  • Master, American College of Physicians, November 2002
  • National Associate, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Washington, DC, December 2004
  • Morris F. Collen Award for Distinguished Contributions to Medical Informatics, American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI), November 2006
  • Commencement Speaker and Honorary Doctor of Science, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, May 2013
  • Elected Founding Member, International Academy of Health Sciences Informatics (IAHSI), International Medical Informatics Association, May 2017
  • Convocation Speaker and Honorary Doctorate, Telfer School, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, June 2017

Work History

Edward H. Shortliffe is Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Informatics in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University and at Columbia University's Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons .  He is also Adjunct Professor of Healthcare Policy and Research (Health Informatics) at Weill Cornell Medical College and a Senior Executive Consultant to IBM Watson Health.  Previously he was a Scholar in Residence at the New York Academy of Medicine (2012-2017) and served as President and Chief Executive Officer of AMIA, the American Medical Informatics Association (2009-2012). Earlier he held positions as Professor of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Texas Health Science Center, Professor of Biomedical Informatics at Arizona State University, and Professor of Basic Medical Sciences and Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine.  He served as the founding dean of the Phoenix campus of the University of Arizonas College of Medicine (2007-2008).  Before that he was the Rolf A. Scholdager Professor and Chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Columbia (2000-2007) and Professor of Medicine and of Computer Science at Stanford University (1979-2000).

After receiving an A.B. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard College in 1970, he moved to Stanford University where he was awarded a Ph.D. in Medical Information Sciences in 1975 and an M.D. in 1976.  During the early-1970s, he was principal developer of the medical expert system known as MYCIN.  After a pause for internal medicine house-staff training at Massachusetts General Hospital and Stanford Hospital between 1976 and 1979, he joined the Stanford internal medicine faculty where he served as Chief of General Internal Medicine, Associate Chair of Medicine for Primary Care, and was director of an active research program in clinical information systems and decision support.  He spearheaded the formation of a Stanford graduate degree program in biomedical informatics and divided his time between clinical medicine and biomedical informatics research.

Dr. Shortliffe is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine) and an elected fellow of both the American College of Medical Informatics and the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.  Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Biomedical Informatics, he is also senior editor of Biomedical Informatics:  Computer Applications in Health Care and Biomedicine (a textbook published by Springer).  He also received the Morris F. Collen Award of the American College of Medical Informatics in 2006. Dr. Shortliffe has authored over 350 articles and books in the fields of biomedical computing and artificial intelligence. More details are available on his personal home page.

Consulting

Since 2016, Senior Executive Consultant to IBM Watson Health, Cambridge, MA.

Expertise Areas